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Recipes

Category: Recipes | Posted on: May 29, 2014

Mrs Simkins’ Anzac Biscuits

Anzac Biscuits 1

During WW1, relatives of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, baked these delicious and energy-giving biscuits, named in their honour, and sent them to the troops fighting in Gallipoli. Conditions in the Turkish region were desperate with intense heat, plagues of flies and disease. It is to be hoped the biscuits travelled well and gave the troops some small comfort.

The biscuits have stood the test of time and are just as delicious today: perfect as a heartening bite with a strong cup of Clipper Fair Trade Everyday tea.

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Category: Recipes | Posted on: April 17, 2014

Mrs Simkins’ Maids of Honour

Maids & TreatsThe dainty little tarts are traditionally served at May Day celebrations. Who knows whether the original tarts were called after the stylish young ladies at the court of Henry VIII, as is commonly supposed, or, since they are filled with curds made from the new spring milk, the more humble milkmaids?

Wherever the name originates, they are delicious, delicate little morsels and perfect with a pot of your favourite Clipper tea on a spring afternoon.

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Category: Recipes | Posted on: April 4, 2014

Mrs Simkins’ Easter Biscuits

Easter Biscuits and Fairtrade Everyday  3It traditional to offer guests home-baked Easter biscuits on Easter Sunday. The tradition began originally in the West Country but Easter biscuits now appear at Easter time all over Britain.

Lovely and crumbly when you bite into them, enriched with egg, containing baking powder and usually spice, they are often a bit bigger than the average biscuit. Fluted edges and a dusting of caster sugar are also hallmarks.

Serve with a big pot of Clipper Fairtrade Everyday tea.

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Category: Recipes | Posted on: February 13, 2014

Mrs Simpkins’ Crumbly Rhubarb Sandwich Bars

Rhubarb Bars 3These deliciously crumbly, tart, yet sweet, bars are perfect with a cup of your favourite Clipper tea. Try them as a breakfast treat with a spoonful of yoghurt. Use either forced or maincrop rhubarb.

The basic mixture works beautifully for both the base and the topping: simply press 2/3 of the mix into the pan for the bottom, and use the remaining mix to scatter over the top (see below). The rhubarb isn’t pre-cooked; the slender slices will cook in the mixture.

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